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Thursday, November 20, 2014

Exhibit by Syd Cross, Clemson University Alumni Distinguished Professor of Art, at Pickens County Museum of Art & History


The Pickens County Museum of Art & History will be presenting two new exhibitions beginning December 4, 2014. Please join us from 6:00 until 8:30 p.m. on Thursday, December 4 as we host a reception to meet the printmaker, Sydney A. Cross, who through her work addresses the value we impose on living things and how that makes us treat each other.

Sydney A. Cross, teaches printmaking and art at Clemson University and was awarded the title of Alumni Distinguished Professor of Art. Always professionally active, she is past vice president and then President of the Southern Graphics Council, the largest printmaking society in North America. She has also been awarded residencies at Frans Masareel Graphic Center in Kasterlee, Belgium and the Virginia Center of Creative Arts in Sweet Briar, VA. She has given numerous panel presentations at regional, national, and international conferences and symposiums including the Southeastern College Art Association in Richmond, VA in 1999, Print Odyssey conference in Cortona Italy in 2001, and the 2003 National Association for Humanities Conference in Austin, Texas. As an artist she has participated in several important portfolio exchanges, including Suite X, Printer’s Almanac, Tempe Suite, Images 2010, and Drawn to Stone, a celebration of Two Hundred Years of Lithography.


Her work can be found in numerous collections including the Whitney Museum of American Art, The Smithsonian Museum, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, MO, Boston Museum of Fine Art, Boston, MA, Fogg Art Museum, Cambridge, MA, The Museum of Fine Art , Antwerp, Belgium, and the Library of Congress, Washington, DC. Her work has been exhibited regionally, nationally, and internationally. In addition to solo exhibitions, she has had work included in the 25th Bradley National Print and Drawing Exhibition, Peoria, IL., Parkside National Small Print Exhibition, Kenosha, WI, “Hand Pulled Prints III”, Stonemetal Press, San Antonio, TX, “Mixed Media” at the Slidell Cultural Center in Louisiana, Paper in Particular, Columbia College, Columbia, MO, and the Irene Leach Memorial Exhibition, Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, VA.

When asked about this exhibition, Cross said, “This represents a slice of the work I have been engaged with over the past five years having to do with values, which is an overarching theme of my studio practice. It addresses my concerns for nature and all living beings, how we treat one another, and the values from which we operate. Some methods for presenting these ideas use images of animals, news events, and media sources.”

“The work with animals include research and sometimes documentation of information that is intended to point towards a wider understanding of the status of particular species and the effect our culture and politics have on them.”

She continued, “The newer work I have included here is generated from media sources covering current events, fashion, Art, and interior design. I first create collages from these sources and then represent them in various hand print processes, sometimes adding text. I find the translation into these processes facilitates a physical presence that the commercial printing cannot provide.”

“Whether it is mashing up couture fashion alongside a slick add for fine art or a political ad placed next to a reproduction of unaffordable expensive jewelry, I cannot escape the commentaries inherent. A critique is delivered through the added text or title. Sometimes for the sake of levity I feel compelled to pair the collages with an image of wildlife. I refer to this work as cultural strata.”

“Sydney A. Cross: Prints” is sponsored in part by South State Bank, Pickens Savings & Loan and Robinson Funeral Home, Crematory and Memorial Gardens. The Pickens County Museum of Art & History is funded in part by Pickens County, members and friends of the museum and a grant from the South Carolina Arts Commission, which receives support from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Located at the corner of Hwy. 178 at 307 Johnson Street in Pickens SC, the museum is open Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 9:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m., Thursdays from 9:00 a.m. until 7:30 p.m. and Saturdays from 9:00 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. Admission is free but donations are welcomed.

For more information please contact the museum at (864) 898-5963 or visit us at www.pickenscountymuseum.org <http://www.pickenscountymuseum.org> . For this and many more events in Pickens County visit www.visitpickenscounty.com/calendar <http://www.visitpickenscounty.com/calendar> .

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

Women’s Studio Workshop's Internships

Summer intern Isabel Francis-Bongue polishing her papermaking skills.
Women’s Studio Workshop hosts two studio interns who work with WSW staff on projects including printmaking, papermaking, book arts, and arts administration, in addition to assisting with the ongoing operations of the facility. Interns are crucial participants in the creative community of WSW. They are asked to work hard, and in return they are encouraged, supported and challenged in their creative lives.

Typical intern tasks include, among others: maintaining the studios; assisting residents in the production of artists’ books and projects; designing, printing and distributing brochures and posters; administrative duties assisting in all aspects of the exhibition program; preparing the apartments for visiting artists/instructors; setting up evening programs; managing the set up and breakdown of lunch each day and work as studio assistants in all classes.

Interns work 40 hours a week, generally Monday-Friday, 9-5 pm, but the schedule changes to accommodate the workshop’s schedule. WSW provides a private room in our on campus Anne Atwood artist’s housing and a stipend of $250/month. Intern sessions culminate with an exhibition of work created during their stay.

POSTMARK DEADLINES:
February 15 for Summer – Fall internships
Notification Date: Applicants will be notified via email by April 15
Length of Internship: 6 months
Internship Occurs: July – December following application
October 15 for Winter – Spring internships
Notification Date: Applicants will be notified via email by November 15
Length of Internship: 6 months
Internship Occurs: January – June following application
APPLICATION MUST INCLUDE:
  • A letter of interest addressing why an internship at WSW is important to you, and what type of experience(s) you would bring to WSW
  • Three current letters of reference
  • A resume
  • Up to 10 images of recent work with an image script, which should include title, medium, dimension, and date. Check our FAQ sheet for digital specifications
CLICK HERE TO APPLY ONLINE

WSW is in the process of moving to a digital application format, and we now receive all applications online. Applicants who do not have access to the Internet may contact us by phone.

Monday, November 10, 2014

Liminal Sustenance Features Clemson University MFA in Art Candidates Kawar and Pafford


Liminal Sustenance
November 10 – 14, 2014
Artist Lectures:  Wednesday, November 12, 2 p.m.
Artist Reception: Friday, November 14, 6 – 8 p.m.
Lee Gallery, 1-100 Lee Hall
Clemson – The Lee Gallery at Clemson University Center for Visual Arts is hosting a new exhibit “Liminal Sustenance” currently on display until this Friday, November 14.  The exhibit showcases the work of two MFA thesis candidates from the Department of Art Ceramics program.  A public lecture is scheduled to take place Wednesday, November 12 at 2:30 p.m. with both artists giving a ten-minute creative research presentation on the development of their works. A reception for the artists will take place Friday, November 14, 6 – 8 p.m.
Websters dictionary defines liminal as “of or relating to a sensory threshold” and sustenance as “something (such as food) that keeps someone or something alive.”   These two words combined as the exhibition title Liminal Sustenance refers to the viewers experience when assimilating this ephemeral, textual and tactile exhibition.
Brent Pafford’s work incorporates art, craft, and design celebrating objects’ potency in daily life. Through the ruminative process of creating, his objects remain earnest and honest, maintaining a casualness that speaks to their humble beginnings.  Entering into his installation viewers is presented with the relationship between functional objects, utility and presentation.  The artist writes, “We surround ourselves with physical and visual remnants preserving experiences of time and place, collecting symbolic objects we create comfortable and lived in atmospheres.”  Walking into Pafford’s installation asks the viewer to consider his objects in their constructed context.
Nina Kawar’s work examines the ephemerality of intermediate spaces that evoke vulnerability through the use of deconstructed materials. The role of her work is to convey this condition through object and experience that suggests a simultaneous state of presence and absence.  The current installation in the Lee Gallery presents the work through a compressed entry point at the entrance of the gallery and opening up to an installation that is an experiential passage way into a space that is ethereal and otherworldly.
The Center for Visual Arts – Lee Gallery at Clemson University is open Monday – Friday, 9 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. and is located at 1-100 Lee Hall, 323 Fernow Street, Clemson, SC 29634.  Events and receptions at the Lee Gallery are free and open to the public.  For more information about the Lee Gallery, contact Denise Woodward-Detrich, Director atwoodwaw@clemson.edu.

Drawings and paintings by Kathleen Thum, Assistant Professor of Art at Clemson University, on display at Furman University


Full Flow, Kathleen Thum
Drawings and paintings by Kathleen Thum, Assistant Professor of Art at Clemson University, will be on display Nov. 10-Dec. 12 in Thompson Gallery of the Roe Art Building on the Furman University campus. Thompson Gallery hours are 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday through Friday. A reception for the artist is scheduled for Monday, Nov. 10, 6:30-8:30 p.m., with a gallery talk by Thum at 7 p.m., in the Roe Art Building.
The exhibition, Residuum, is free and open to the public, and is presented by the Furman Department of Art.
In an artist’s statement, Thum describes her work as “a hybrid of various human physiological systems and man-made manufacturing systems.” She depicts these systems through rendering abstract networks of forms, lines, and color. Says Thum, “Like our internal anatomy, the structures in my works are layered, linear, flowing, clustered, open, dense, intertwined; interpreting gravity, fluids, gases, and pressures. The complex relationship between the man-made and the natural has become increasing influential in my artwork. The drawings evolve as I use color and layering to create new imagery based on the fascinating inter-workings of systems both functional and dysfunctional.”
For more information about Thum’s work, visit kathleenthum.com, or contact Furman’s Department of Art at (864) 294-2074.

Thursday, November 6, 2014

"The most important elements of any civilization include its independent creators."

Abraham Kaminstein
"The basic purpose of copyright is the public interest, to make sure that the wellsprings of creation do not dry up through lack of incentive, and to provide an alternative to the evils of an authorship dependent upon private or public patronage. As the founders of this country were wise enough to see, the most important elements of any civilization include its independent creators - its authors, composers and artists - who create as a matter of personal initiative and spontaneous expression rather than as a result of patronage or subsidy."

~Abraham Kaminstein, 1965, Former head of the U.S. Copyright Office.

I found this yesterday researching copyright law.  Just thought I'd share. Greg

Tuesday, November 4, 2014

Visions & Fissures by Clemson University MFA Alumna, Sarah West [née Butler], at Wake Forest University's START Galley


Reception: Thursday, November 13, 5-6:30 PM
NOVEMBER 7 - NOVEMBER 22

Sarah's work references both Early Renaissance paintings and digital technology through highly-saturated and detailed hybrids of painting styles.  The religious narratives combined with digital symbols and artifacts of digital processes suggests the spiritual undercurrents surrounding digital technology in its potential for enlightenment, transcendence, and evoking a sense of the infinite.

As a body, the work refers to the history of image-making and hints at an elusiveness in capturing the world around us. Within her paintings, visual cues of photo-editing software point to a type of idealized virtual reality while the disjointed space of the Renaissance compositions and computer glitch imagery reminds the viewer this ideal space is fraught with roadblocks.

Instead of using a digital medium to talk about this experience Sarah incorporates the historicity of oil on canvas or panel to enforce the tension between new and old present in her compositional subject matter.

West's work points to the persistence of our desire to be transported by visual means and explores ways the spiritual realm has been represented in the past and today.

For more information:
START Gallery
122A Reynolda Village
Winston-Salem, NC 27106
336.245.8508
info@wfustartgallery.com
wfustartgallery.com

Open Mon–Sat, 10am–6pm

Artist's Statement

Technology “is the product of a profound human desire for transcendence: to be out of body, out of mind, beyond language. Virtual space and dataspace constitute the domain, previously provided by myth and religion, where imagination, desire, and will can reengage the forces of space, time and matter in the battle for a new reality”. - Roy Ascott

My work references both Early Renaissance paintings and digital technology through highly-saturated and detailed hybrids of painting styles. The religious narratives combined with digital symbols and artifacts of digital processes suggest the spiritual undercurrents surrounding digital technology in its potential for enlightenment, transcendence, and evoking a sense of the infinite.

As a body, the work refers to the history of image-making and hints at an elusiveness in capturing the world around us. Paintings from the Early Renaissance era are marked by a flawed understanding of perspective, resulting in awkward spatial depictions immediately evident to contemporary viewers. Despite our progress in creating realistic depictions of the natural world, the fact that many Photoshop tools used to create more believable depictions of form and space are already identifiable to a contemporary viewer suggests a persistent inability to capture the physical world in all of its complexity. Within my paintings, visual cues of photo-editing software point to a type of idealized virtual reality while the disjointed space of the Renaissance compositions and computer glitch imagery reminds the viewer this ideal space is fraught with roadblocks. By calling attention to the tools used to create illusions, I remind the viewer that our understanding of reality is often mediated and therefore less concrete than we might think.

There is a sense of a quest for the spiritual in both Renaissance and digital spaces that I find fascinating. Echoing this perennial quest, I position my viewer as an explorer and navigator roaming through various types of spaces coexisting within one composition, addressing the potential for fluidity between the concrete and the ineffable.

I feel it’s important to look at our culture in light of the past as a means to make sense of our experience in an increasingly rapidly shifting society. The recent strides in technological discovery in addition to my experience growing up at a time when the Internet first became widely available have generated a personal fascination with shifting modes of perceiving the world. Cyberspace with its endless databanks has become “ ‘nature’ for postmodern man” (Lyotard 51). This digital scenery has become so integrated into my life that I feel it is important to examine critically, attempting to understand and consider the cognitive and perceptual results. Instead of using a digital medium to talk about this experience I incorporate the historicity of oil on canvas or panel to enforce the tension between new and old present in my compositional subject matter.

My work points to the persistence of our desire to be transported by visual means and explores ways the spiritual realm has been represented in the past and today. The resulting paintings evoke a divine encounter, reflecting on both the religious subject matter referenced in Renaissance sources and the mystical aura surrounding new technologies.

About the Artist:
EDUCATION

2012: MFA Emphasis in painting, Clemson University

2009: School of the Art Institute of Chicago

2008: Post Baccalaureate Certificate, Virginia Commonwealth University

2007: BA in Studio Art, emphasis in Painting with a minor in Psychology, Wake Forest University

SOLO/2 PERSON EXHIBITIONS

Sarah’s work has been shown in the following Solo/ 2 Person Exhibitions:

2014: The Thing In Itself, 2-person exhibition, Bibb City Gallery, Columbus, GA

2013: Visions & Fissures, solo, W.C. Bradley Co. Museum, Columbus, Georgia

2012: Visions & Fissures, MFA 2-person exhibition, Lee Gallery, Clemson, SC

SELECTED GROUP EXHIBITIONS

Below is a selection of the Group Exhibitions Sarah’s work has been shown in:

2014: Millenial, Movement Gallery of Art, Atlanta, GA

2014: Let There Be Art, Columbus Museum, Columbus, GA

2014: Live Amateurs, Mint Gallery, Atlanta, GA; juror: Craig Drennen

2013: Georgia Artists Selecting Georgia Artists, MOCA GA, Atlanta, GA; jurors: Xie Caomin, Larry Walker and Martha Whittington

2012: National Wet Paint Juried Exhibition: Contemporary MFA Painting; Exhibition, Zhou B Gallery, Chicago, IL

2012: Reaction/Action, Lee Gallery, Clemson, SC

2011: Upstate Visual Arts, 2011 Fall Juried Show, Village Studios, Greenville, SC; juror: Tom Flowers, Professor Emeritus of Art at Furman University

2010: Midnight Snacks: Chicago,1366 Space, Chicago, IL

2008: Treading Water, Virginia Commonwealth University Fine Arts Building, Richmond, VA

Monday, October 27, 2014

The Art of Winston Wingo, Clemson University Art Department MFA Alum, at Arthur Rose Museum, Clafin University


Winston A. Wingo, an alum of Clemson University's Master of Fine Arts program (Art-sculpture, 1980), is the featured artist for an exhibit celebrating the 20th Anniversary of Clafin University President, Henry N. Tisdale and Mrs. Tisdale.  The exhibition runs from October 2-November 23, 2014. 

The Arthur Rose Museum is located on the campus of Claflin University in Orangeburg, 400 Magnolia St. The museum is open Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Because of limited on-campus parking, guests are encouraged to call ahead and make an appointment for a tour of the museum, (803) 535-5324.

Arthur Rose Museum of Art
Claflin University, founded in 1869, is the oldest historically black university in South Carolina. Support for the institution in the early days came primarily from Methodists in the New England and Middle Atlantic states. Mrs. Priscilla E. Lee Bennett, gave funds to erect the first separate library building at Claflin. She asked that the building bear her maiden name, Lee, and that the name inscribed on a terra cotta tablet next to the front porch; another tablet bears the date 1898.
The architect was a Claflin graduate who had returned to teach. He was William Wilson Cooke, the son of a prominent Reconstructionist in Greenville, SC. While teaching at Claflin, Cooke drew plans for the Lee Library in the current Victorian style and supervised its execution by his students in 1898. Students even fired the bricks in kilns dug on the campus. Except for the loss of the original metal tile roof, little has changed on the exterior save the expansion of a rear window into a doorway. A change mandated by fire codes. A walk around the building reveals interesting architectural details in the ornate trim work, chimneys and urn grills. After the library relocated to another part of the campus, this building housed the art department for many years with Professor Arthur Rose as Chairman. Later, the art department moved to Layman Hall.

After the board of trustees decided to convert the old Lee building into a museum, an effort progressed to restore much of the original appearance of the interior of the building. Removing the carpet revealed the beautiful hardwood floors. The pressed metal ceiling is visible in near perfect condition. We welcome you to what has now become the Arthur Rose Museum.